Agricultural Science in Learning Perspective

Agricultural Science in Learning Perspective
Urban agriculture is the practice of cultivating, processing and distributing food in or around cities. [1] Urban agriculture can also involve animal husbandry, aquaculture, agroforestry, and horticulture. In broad terms, urban agriculture describes the entire food production system that occurs in urban areas.
In current practice, Urban Farming agriculture in big cities leads to agricultural development that has aesthetic value and has wider benefits for psychology and the environment. [Citation needed]

FAO defines urban agriculture as:
An industry that produces, processes, and markets biofuel products and fuels, especially in response to the daily demands of consumers in cities, which applies intensive production methods, utilizes and recycles urban resources and waste to produce a variety of crops and livestock.
[2 ]
The definition provided by Science References for Education on Liniki Papers Reviews, covers aspects of environmental health, remediation, and recreation. [3] Policies in various cities also include aspects of city beauty and the feasibility of using sustainable spatial planning in implementing urban agriculture. [4]
The difference between urban and non-urban agriculture can be quite large, and the challenges that exist in urban agriculture can be called the power they have. Variations in urban socio-economic conditions, culture, to geography, climate, and land area lead to various innovations and local government policies. Diversity that distinguishes between cities and cities can create its own uniqueness.
[5] [6] This agriculture has also led to various local movements and so on which serve as a means of sharing information and buying and selling facilities for local products, thereby generating income, reducing the risk of excess pesticides and chemicals in public consumption, thus increasing food security. [5] Because urban agriculture is said to shorten the distance between producers and consumers so preservatives and additional processes are not needed. This makes consumers get guaranteed food that is obtained so fresh.
Urban farming is generally done to increase income or activities to produce food for family consumption, and in some places it is done for recreational and relaxation purposes.
[7] Awareness about environmental degradation in urban areas due to the relocation of resources to serve urban populations has made inspiration for various urban agriculture schemes in developed and developing countries and brought various forms of urban agriculture, from historical models such as Machu Picchu to agriculture in modern cities.
As a result of the Green Roof Tax Abatement Program and the Green Infrastructure Grant Program [8] [9] since 2010 the city of New York has experienced an increase in the number of rooftop farms in the city. various roofs of buildings and houses that are managed privately.
[10]
Urban agriculture has positive benefits that are driven by various things:
50% of the world’s population lives in cities. [13]
Low-income urban residents spend 40-60% of their income on food. [14]
250 million people categorized as starvation-prone are in urban areas. [15]
It is estimated that in 2015, 26 cities worldwide will have a population of more than 10 million. To meet the food needs of the population estimated at 6000 tons per day, food must be imported from outside the city. [16]
In 1999, 800 million people were involved in urban agriculture throughout the world, as planters, sellers, and consumers, and contributed to the development of agriculture in urban areas.
[17]
The difference between urban and non-urban agriculture can be quite large, and the challenges that exist in urban agriculture can be called the power they have. Variations in urban socio-economic conditions, culture, to geography, climate, and land area lead to various innovations and local government policies. Diversity that distinguishes between cities and cities can create its own uniqueness. [5] [6] This agriculture has also led to various local movements such as “foodies”, “locavores”, “organic growers” and so on which serve as a means of sharing information and buying and selling facilities for local products, thus generating income, reducing the risk of pesticides and excess chemicals in public consumption, thus increasing food security.
[5] Because urban agriculture is said to shorten the distance between producers and consumers so preservatives and additional processes are not needed. This makes consumers get guaranteed food that is obtained so fresh. Urban with one another that is different is able to achieve benefits and complement each other so that it can meet the needs of people’s lives.
Economic and geographical access to nutritious food, is one perspective in urban agriculture. With the increasing world population in urban areas, the demand for fresh and safe food is increasing. Areas that have food insecurity will have limited choices for food because of limited access, and people will tend to choose processed foods such as fast food or packaged foods produced by industry, and which have high calories and low nutrition. This causes various health problems such as obesity and diabetes.
Urban farming has a social and emotional impact on everyone. Various individuals have reported reduced levels of stress and improved mental health because they have the opportunity to interact with nature through gardens. Yard and garden in urban areas are known to relax and soothe, and provide a place for people to rest in crowded urban areas.
[22] There has been documentation that gardens and yards owned by communities increase social relations between individuals due to increased contact between community components, the movement of each individual, and pride. Improved public social health also has a relationship to reduced crime rates and suicides. [22] For many people, the existence of a garden is also a matter of pride in neighborly life. [23] The ability of an individual to produce his own food can also be regarded as a matter of pride, especially because of the formation of independence [22] and escape from the food supply chain managed by various large companies.
Primary activities in gardening such as hoeing, contribute to improving the physical health of urban communities. Urban farming activities like this are considered more fun than exercising at a gymnasium. In places that have shared gardens, the community generally reaches the place on foot or by bicycle, which also has physical health benefits. [24]
Some urban agriculture can be very efficient and help women find work in places where they are marginalized in finding work in the formal sector.
[25] [26]
Urban agriculture is also often carried out on land that is not used (idle land). The existence of this idle land often increases fears of conflict between individuals related to their ownership status and the planning of the urban spatial function which is often initiated by various regional leaders. The International Development Research Center together with FAO publishes guidelines on urban policies on urban agriculture, and works with city governments to plan urban agriculture in line with land use planning functions. [27]